Author Archives: Diana ben-Aaron

the 200th of March

Six months into the Covid era. It is now 193 days since we were sent home from campus on 6 March, and 183 days since the UK lockdown took effect on 16 March. We are in a twilight regime where … Continue reading

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125 days

125 days since the red alert sent us home from work. 115 days since the lockdown order. There have been soft openings in sector after sector over the last six weeks but our public and private lives are by no … Continue reading

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a knife, a pot and a cooker

I may not have homeschooled children, learned Spanish, or made a film in lockdown, but I have certainly leveled up in cooking. This was unexpected, since my usual position on food is, “It’s all right, I guess, but I don’t … Continue reading

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first Bookcrossing meetup since March

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the right to celebrate

Although the change of pace on the holidays we grew up with feels like a natural right, the legal basis is less clear than we might like. Here in the UK, bank holidays are established by the Banking and Financial … Continue reading

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when we celebrate

In discussing the place of Juneteenth in the US holiday calendar, it is worth looking at the whole yearly round. Europeans often express amazement at the short annual leave that is given to workers in the United States: the minimum … Continue reading

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juneteenth: revisiting celebration

Space is a central focus in the #BlackLivesMatter protests working to dismantle racial orders, as well as the counterprotests. The protest actions are taking place in public spaces, already changed by the Covid pandemic. Material symbols of white supremacy such … Continue reading

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swearing, no screaming

Howard Dean had a Zoom call with Democrats Abroad today. There was self-redacted swearing but no screaming. Dean is now in charge of the Dem clearinghouse of voter data which aims to source information from different organizations to identify voters … Continue reading

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no way out

Former Commerce Secretary Robert Reich on yesterday’s livestream from Democrats Abroad UK. Some notes: – Reich says we’re at a once in a hundred years crisis, a “triple barreled emergency” of “pandemic, econom[ic collapse], and racism and its consequences.”– Calls … Continue reading

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not premier league, learned league

Red alert, day 76. Lockdown, day 66. Some days I’m really fine with lockdown – the introvert cry of, “I’ve been preparing my whole life for this!” – and some days I feel buried alive. This was one of the … Continue reading

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panic don’t panic

Red alert, day 75. Lockdown, day 65. Private Eye is doing a good job of covering the pandemic these days, not a surprise for the last investigations-focused news organ left. (Cleverly camouflaged with the cover and center section of humor … Continue reading

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partial explanations

Red alert, day 74. Lockdown, day 64. More of Warren Weaver, this time on scientific explanation. Many of us have thought the following, for example when reading bad wall texts in science museums, but Weaver, with the confidence of the … Continue reading

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